Author

Julianne Mosher

Browsing

I was at work when I had a realization. It was early August and I had just started my job working in the film industry. My life was good: college was done, I was making money, my cats were plump and healthy – what could go wrong? Every morning I would stroll into work at a major television network that was in charge of playing the movies and shows that flow through your tubes. It was great there. I felt safe. For 12 hours a day, I used my $40,000 Stony Brook University degree, and it was glorious… but then I started to feel weary. It was October. Clowns were surfacing in the woods surrounding Long Island. Murderers were crawling out of their crypts near the already haunted Pilgrim State. Halloween was approaching – a holiday made famous for its tricks and treats. But no. Not there. Not at that…

“For me it begins with a scene, and I don’t know what it means. I get a vision, and then I start moving around on it and it grows in all directions,” Professor Charles Haddad said while he sat in his office on the fourth floor of Melville Library at Stony Brook University. His small room, right on the corner of the Journalism Department wing, held a desk with a brand new Mac desktop on top of it. Behind it on the wall hung a cork board, tacked to it a newspaper article about a previous novel he wrote. He has written several different novels, ranging from children’s chapter books to books that teach his students how to write well. But as of this summer, he finally published a book he had been working on for a very long time. Professor Haddad was working as a journalist all over the…

Tom Catt looks different during the day, but at night, when he slips on his size 13 women’s heels, corset and a dress, he becomes royalty. He becomes a drag queen. If you see him during the day as regular ol’ Tom, he’s an above average size, fit male. He has dark hair, sometimes with a beard and sometimes with chest hair sticking out. Butat night, he transforms. His face is a canvas that he begins to transform with foundation, blush, eye shadows, lipstick and mascara, which he can paint on with ease. But don’t ask him to glue on his false lashes in a split second because that’s his least favorite part of the mask. “I haven’t mastered the application, and they do make me look better. But until I master the technique, they’re the biggest pain in the ass,” he laughed. But what women go through every day–sometimes…

Lyvette De Jesus Cruz is only 19-years-old. She’s tall, has curly dark hair and wears glasses that sit perfectly on her face. She has a big smile that she wears often and is known throughout the Stony Brook University Music Department as one of the most hardworking students on campus. “I always ask if she’s tired because she works so hard that she has to be tired,” Susie Kaiserman, the receptionist of the music department on the third floor of Staller Music said. Despite all the extra curricular activities that De Jesus Cruz is involved with, she says that she doesn’t even drink caffeinated drinks. The 19-year-old junior is a music major at SBU whose specialty is the oboe. For about eight years she has been intensely studying the instrument, resulting in a talent that led the Puerto Rican born student from her home country to America. Born and raised…

Two shops down from the Starbucks coffee house at 23 N Main Street in Sayville, NY, a boutique stands right next to an old barbershop. The two displays on both sides of its windows are updated at the beginning of each month and showcase an artistic rendition of something fashion. In October, a group of flappers stood alongside small artistic sculptures that resemble jack-in-the-boxes. They are abstract but they tell a story. It’s October and Halloween is coming soon. A few homemade, black-laced masks lay on the floor facing the window, peering out as people walk by. But in the blink of an eye, it was the start of November and 1970s vintage pieces clothe the mannequins in red, orange and yellow ponchos. They wear tall brown leather boots and carry purses with tan fringes to celebrate the start of the Thanksgiving holiday. The mannequin in the left window wore…

At 22 years old, Laurence Vesyoly graduated from college with a degree. On the small piece of paper it said he spent his four years at Stony Brook University studying music and engineering. He was one of dozens upon dozens of students who decided to devote their future careers to a passion and an art, music: a difficult field to eventually find a job in. “I actually didn’t expect to study music when I came here,” Vesyoly said in a private Facebook message. “I originally came here to study electrical engineering, and I graduated with degrees in both engineering and music this May.” After becoming heavily involved with the music department at SBU during his sophomore year, the graduate said that music “slowly took over my life and now it’s what I want to do.” Originally being fluent on the piano, he became infatuated with another type of instrument that…

The Stony Brook University music department is a globally known place that keeps on growing. Among its huge variety in different types of music learned and performed are the strings – including two different orchestras – which students are able to play in. The two major ensembles at SBU are the Stony Brook University Orchestra and the Stony Brook University Symphony Orchestra. David Lawton is the managing director of the SBUSO and elaborated on what the differences are between these two huge ensembles that perform. “The level of this particular orchestra is high,” he said. “People from all over the world come to play here.” Compared to the SBU Orchestra, directed by Susan Deaver, the SBUSO is an orchestra made up of graduate and doctoral students who have to take the company as a required course. This semester, there are three undergraduate students who made the cut to play. However…

She smiles as she walks around the mall in her sparkly, fitted gown. Her white braid falls down to her navel, and she adjusts the silver-sequined snowflakes pinned into her wig. She’s sweating but she’s smiling as people stop to look at her. “Look mommy! It’s Elsa!” a little girl of about four screams. “Do you want to build a snowman?” she asks the child. The little girl looks up at the ice queen in amazement as her parents snap pictures on their cell phones in the middle of Smithaven Mall in Lake Grove, New York. Dina Dolan is 35 and has been a princess since she was 15. Her signature look was always Ariel, the Little Mermaid, and she was always told that she had the typical princess look. She has wide eyes; fair, clear skin and a white smile that holds straight teeth. She is an artist, a…

In late August, a former shipping container made its way onto campus. Inside the green and white vehicle were rows upon rows of tiny circles, some filled with what looks like dirt and some growing little buds of green matter. Air-conditioned and cool, purple and pink lights shone as if a rave could breakout at any second. This container is Stony Brook’s latest addition to sustainability on campus, a freight farm,  or “The Leafy Green Machine” as some call it, and it is here to change campus dining. The freight farm is allowing students to grow and manage vegetables hydroponically for the first time behind Roth Café. When the plants are ready within 10 weeks at most, they will be delivered to the different dining halls on campus – a huge change for the way students consume on campus while also helping to save the planet. Managed by David Schmitz,…