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In 2014, Netflix introduced “Bojack Horseman,” a show that takes a satirical look at Hollywood  while also commenting on contemporary celebrity culture. The show follows the character of Bojack Horseman (Will Arnett), an anthropomorphic horse who works as anactor in Hollywood. After the recent announcement of Season 5, a few questions entered my mind about the future of Bojack. Will Bojack be able to continue delivering more funny jokes and punchlines? Will he let his old nihilistic ways get the best of him? Or willhe continue to be the caring and compassionate individual that he is at the end of Season 4? When I first started watching “Bojack Horseman,” I thought it was going to be a typical comedy, like “Family Guy” or “South Park,” where punchlines repeat themselves and eventually get old. Once I really got into it, however, I found it hard to stop laughing because the series…

“What is it, to be a hero?” This is the opening statement in Karen Page’s (Deborah Ann Woll) article on vigilantes, but it’s also the overarching theme of season two of Daredevil. What truly defines a hero? Is it the decision to sacrifice one’s humanity to protect a city, the choice to be cold and unforgiving in the pursuit of revenge or the act of defying destiny to find happiness? Conveniently enough, these three issues plague Daredevil’s title character and the two new players in the war between heroes and villains in Hell’s Kitchen. At the end of the new batch of 13 episodes streaming on Netflix, Daredevil closes out with admittedly less of a punch than season one but something that changes Karen’s question to something more specific: what is it to be Matt Murdock AND Daredevil? Mr. Murdock (Charlie Cox) seems to be balancing himself out well: he…

Uncle Jesse (John Stamos), Joey (Dave Coulier), Danny (Bob Saget) and Aunt Becky (Lori Loughlin) are all back for a nostalgic blast from the past that has critics hating on this much-anticipated reunion. I understand the conflict with the show’s corny humor and attempted warm moments that always ended with hugs.  However, keep in mind that the show is a revival of a sitcom filmed at a time when G-rated shows were the bomb! I must come to the defense of DJ (Candace Cameron-Bure), Stephanie (Jodie Sweetin), and the goofy Kimmy Gibbler (Andrea Barber). The show opens with a pan of the revamped Tanner Family kitchen, reintroducing the central location we remember all too well. There’s Danny’s classic corniness, Uncle Jesse’s suave Elvis Presley-loving personality and Joey’s bullwinkle impersonation (while in his Bugs Bunny pajamas of course). Jesse and Joey engage in their usual banter while Aunt Beckie makes her…

In the past seven years, writer/ director/ producer Ryan Murphy has made an ace career out of over-the-top television. Whether it’s a high school drama (Glee), a scary story (American Horror Story) or a catty mean girl whodunit (Scream Queens), Murphy has taken what could’ve easily been overcooked American soap operas and made them deliciously dramatized cheese. But how does one apply that Midas touch to one of the most infamous American news stories of the last 25 years? Come out with guns blazing and keep people guessing. Based on Jeffrey Toobin’s book, The People v. O.J. Simpson is a limited series running on FX with Murphy as the executive producer and director of the first two episodes. It’s an ensemble drama following the trial of the once-beloved athlete/ superstar for the murder of his ex-wife and her boyfriend. The pilot, “From the Ashes of Tragedy,” premiered this past Tuesday…

Every once in a while comes a television series so refreshing that the cultural impact has the potential to transcend through decades. Recently, I’ve come to believe that series could be Sense8— now streaming on Netflix. Netflix has already established itself as a juggernaut when it comes to original content, with heavy hitters like House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black. Based on overwhelmingly positive audience feedback, Sense8 can now be included to its record of home runs. Though Netflix technically isn’t television, the series surpasses what Toby Miller, a social scientist, says television is supposed to do, which is (1) mirror reality (e.g. Seinfeld, 1994), or (2) create a televisual reality that appeals to a specific audience (e.g. Star Trek, 1966), as a form of entertainment. Sense8 does both. Sense8 is what I like to call “new generation TV,” or what Professor Jon Friedman, of the School…