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George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road is a film, set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland that shows a systematically oppressed group of “Wives” escaping a capitalist cyborg king as he tries to birth the perfect son. The movie opens with the aforementioned king, Immortan Joe, sending his “Imperator” Furiosa, on a mission to “bring back ‘guzzaline’ from Gastown And bullets from the Bullet Farm” (Miller 0:08:00). The audience quickly learns that Furiosa – the short-haired, one-metal-arm warrior woman – is smuggling Joe’s birthing wives to safety. Joe covets these women because his ultimate goal is to produce a son free of mutations, disabilities, or degenerative diseases to carry on his reign since all of his previous attempts have resulted in children who cannot operate without prosthetics. Similarly, this objectification of the Wives institutionalizes their bodies as weak, pure reproductive wombs. Reliance on a prosthetic, liquid (blood, water, milk) or mechanical, is…

Mad Max: Fury Road is a movie about dry, stark insanity, where life is worthless and man is reduced to one instinct: survival. And I’m reduced to one question: “How did they make a movie that worked perfectly for the moviegoer like me?” The opening monologue, provided by Max’s new actor Tom Hardy, is a dry relation of the films general background; a post apocalyptic world where, after unending wars, nuclear devastation and humanity being driven to anarchy, the world has become mad—the most mad it has been in the entire series. From beginning to end, Fury Road holds onto a particular tone that is never quite so mournful that it can’t bask in its 12-year-old sense of joyful havoc. Hardy stares out into the desert, a dry color palette that will not change in the next two hours. Everything is dirty, from the cars with their…