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George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road is a film, set in a post-apocalyptic wasteland that shows a systematically oppressed group of “Wives” escaping a capitalist cyborg king as he tries to birth the perfect son. The movie opens with the aforementioned king, Immortan Joe, sending his “Imperator” Furiosa, on a mission to “bring back ‘guzzaline’ from Gastown And bullets from the Bullet Farm” (Miller 0:08:00). The audience quickly learns that Furiosa – the short-haired, one-metal-arm warrior woman – is smuggling Joe’s birthing wives to safety. Joe covets these women because his ultimate goal is to produce a son free of mutations, disabilities, or degenerative diseases to carry on his reign since all of his previous attempts have resulted in children who cannot operate without prosthetics. Similarly, this objectification of the Wives institutionalizes their bodies as weak, pure reproductive wombs. Reliance on a prosthetic, liquid (blood, water, milk) or mechanical, is…

Warning: Spoilers From Albert R. Broccoli’s and Harry Saltzman’s Eon Productions, in association with MGM Studios and Sony Pictures, comes the twenty-fourth official installment of the billion-dollar James Bond franchise, Spectre, directed by Academy Award-winner Sam Mendes. The film stars Daniel Craig in his fourth (and possibly final) outing as the sleek British agent. Spectre begins with James Bond (Daniel Craig) operating beyond his brief and tracking down an international criminal named Marco Sciarra to Mexico City during a Day of the Dead celebration. After the audience is exposed to the single strangest opening credits sequence for any James Bond film ever, synced to Sam Smith’s “Writing’s on the Wall,” we meet Bond back in London, where M (Ralph Fiennes) is furious with him for all the collateral damage he caused in Mexico City. He orders Q (Ben Whishaw) to implant a tracking device into Bond’s bloodstream. Moneypenny (Naomie Harris)…

I don’t really ask for much when I go to see a Vin Diesel movie. From the infamous high octane action of the Fast and Furious franchise to the jubilant and ridiculous romp that came from Guardians of the Galaxy, I kind of expect just about any movie with the guy to be a good two hours of (mindless) fun. Imagine my surprise when no such fun could be found in his latest theatrical venture, The Last Witch Hunter. Diesel stars in the titular role as Kaulder, a witch hunter who was cursed with immortality after a bout with the evil and powerful Witch Queen in which he seemingly emerged victorious. Eight-hundred years later, Kaulder lives in our modern age and continues his work by keeping today’s witches in check. When his longtime confidant (Michael Caine) is suddenly attacked on the day of his retirement, Kaulder must now find out…

Nothing is scarier than reality. A moment in which you realize you might possibly die is petrifying and immobilizing. That is what sexual assault survivors’ experience. Stories try and capture the human condition, and films are a visualization of that. The only film I have seen that truly and realistically encased the fear that comes with sexual assault was The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. The film featured a whole 20-minute explicit rape scene. It is hard to watch as it can make viewers literally sick to their stomach with rage and disgust. Since rape isn’t the easiest thing for audiences to swallow, I was surprised but intrigued when I found out about  The Hunting Ground, a documentary on the sexual assault epidemic on university campuses. The film was featured in the Sundance Film Festival and premiered to the public last Friday in select theaters. The team behind the film…

In a warehouse in Bushwick, Brooklyn that could only be reached by those who were curious enough to attend and weren’t turned off by its protesters, the “PornHub Presents: NYC Porn Film Festival 2015” was in full swing. PornHub, as its name might suggest, is a popular pornography site. The festival presented bodies of work that explored the concept of humans as “sexual beings.” Its goal was to eliminate the taboo that surrounds the industry and celebrate the art of pornography. The films varied from very tame to hyper erotic, but they were all in the exploration of what turns us on, what may gross us out, what it means to be sexy and what an explicit push for individuality really looks like. The festival received public attention after a bondage film submitted by Miley Cyrus peaked the interest of groups previously unaware of the event. Due to the overwhelming…

Throughout this past awards season, press and people alike have seen exceptional praise  given to two specific movies: Boyhood and Birdman. Both films have been recognized as the best movie of 2014 by multiple award shows. Boyhood earned the top prize at the Golden Globes, the BAFTAs and the AFI. Birdman earned Best Film praise from the Independent Spirit Awards, the Gotham Awards and the Screen Actors Guild. When it came to the Oscars, guesses were 50/50 between the two critical darlings as to who would take home the shiny golden man in what The Huffington Post called, “one of the haziest Best Picture races in recent memory.” On Feb. 22, the haze was cleared as Birdman took home the Best Picture trophy at the Oscars. While some might be ecstatic about that choice, others feel that it was the wrong move. Richard Brody of The New Yorker claimed that…

As you might be aware, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) has received a total of nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Director (Alejandro Gonzalez Innarritu), Actor (Michael Keaton), Supporting Actor (Edward Norton), and Supporting Actress (Emma Stone). It seems highly unlikely that Birdman will walk away from the night without any well-deserved wins. It is, after all, a serious contender for the coveted Best Picture award. Here are five simple reasons why Birdman deserves Best Picture. It would be yet another mistake on the Academy’s part if the film doesn’t win, and will probably be the greatest injustice since Goodfellas losing to Dances with Wolves. It Isn’t Political  Far too many Best Picture winners get the award by hitting the audience over the head with an attempt at a political, social, or historical “message.” We have seen this demonstrated time and time again, especially within the last…