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Alongside the dozens of students making their way around Stony Brook campus daily, you’ll find dozens of geese not too far off. They are a familiar sight and, you’d be hardpressed to encounter someone who hasn’t ran into the mostly docile, yet sometimes extremely aggressive, winged residents at Stony Brook. All across the lawn of Tabler to the edges of Roth Pond, they waste no time in leaving behind a trail of shit in their wake. While many try their best to avoid the scattered specks of avian excrement, one student has made it his mission to hunt out and bring a new lease on life to the widespread waste. “I think it’s kind of a rite of passage on campus to accidently step in some of that shit with some new shoes you just bought,” student Andrew Serrano said. For most of last semester, the senior Studio Art major…

Josafat Moreno likes to go by Josco, pronounced hose-co. He has the slender build of a 17-year-old but he’s actually 46. Josco’s mustache sprawls across his upper-lip. It matches a small patch of hair under his lower lip and his neat chin-beard. His black hair appears to have a mind of its own. Sometimes he tames it with a rubber band, which reveals a buzzcut on the sides. Otherwise, the long locks across the top of his head dance around freely. Based on his physical appearance, some may call Josco a “hipster” who lives in a newly gentrified part of Brooklyn. Others may assume that he’s just another European footballer with a trendy haircut. He thinks of himself as an artist. But out of the many things that Josco can be labelled, most people won’t guess that he came into America as an illegal immigrant. Josco doesn’t really flinch or…

David Deng carefully brushes his fifth layer of hard ground, a waxy material that allows drawings to be etched, onto a rectangular copper sheet. Next to him is an unplugged pair of earbuds and a milk chocolate almond Hershey’s bar. While other students in the class are making simpler etchings for linoleum prints, Deng seems to have the most thought-provoking one. It depicts a man with a mask laughing while attempting to hold multiple masks in one arm. On the table he has the initial sketch, a mock-up print and the image he was inspired by.: an humorous internet meme where a man is laughing as he struggles to hold onto a pile of limes in his hand. However, Deng gives this image his own twist. “Each mask is a personality and when you are in different social situations you need to put on a different facade,” he said. Deng…

At 60 miles per hour everything looks like a blur outside the window of a speeding Long Island Rail Road train. The Port Jefferson line cuts through the Island’s thick foliage and creates waves of green, with grey houses and highways cutting into the mix. But as the train begins to slows down into each station, one can’t help but notice the few bits and pieces of graffiti seen on buildings from station to station. Names like JOEY and LAMEO appear suddenly and fade away once the train hits the platform. Impressively, they show up again miles apart from their last location. “It’s very suited to the environment. Painting track spots or trains roots back to the beginning of writing graff. Its has a lot of exposure to the general public who use mass transit to get from A to B, allowing your work to be seen by an endless…

Naveen Mallangada was looking forward to spending his day doing research inside the Division of Cancer Prevention at the Health Science Center before he entered the tunnel. The frigid February air was not enough to kill the excitement the sophomore felt as he walked towards his lab, but the decrepit grey walls that shape the underpass connecting Stony Brook University’s East hospital campus and West undergraduate campus drained his emotion. “I realized that this underpass is one of the only ways students and faculty get to either campuses,” Mallangada said. “It should be an entrance that inspires or at least invigorates people, not depresses them.” Mallangada decided to take matters into his own hands. He began Heartbeats of Stony Brook, a beautification project that aims to add color and vitality to a part of campus that students describe as lackluster, according to Mallangada. “A lot of people say that we…

I really do miss the old Kanye. No, this isn’t about whether or not I think College Dropout is better than Yeezus or if Kanye’s rapping has fallen off. This is about Kanye’s work ethic. The man that used to make three beats a day for three summers has made the decision to release an unfinished piece of work and update it live, thanks to the medium of streaming music. As an artist, one has every right to make changes to their piece of art. Of course, this usually does not happen after the work has been released to the public for purchase or critique. No doubt, Mr. West has done something unprecedented as an artist once again. He is producing an album right in front of us, and we can choose to watch this performance by subscribing to streaming services like Tidal and get to hear the album being…

Five men draw brightly colored letters on the walls around the railroad tracks near East Fordham Road in the Bronx, surrounded by crates of spray paint. They move gracefully with the vibrant mist , creating sharp, crisp lines. Quiet as Buddhist monks, they fill in their letters with colors like “dragon green” and “pussy pink”, creating depth within the wall. Only the noise of mixing balls and hissing aerosol escape the scene. Just a couple feet away from the tracks, two graffiti artists, Skeme and Chain 3 paint their names on a subway car. They aren’t afraid of being caught. They shouldn’t be; they aren’t breaking any laws. This all occurs in “the yard,” an alley owned by Tuff City Styles,  a tattoo store located on 650 East Fordham Road in the Bronx. The owners, who are graffiti artists themselves, recreated the alley to resemble a train yard with a…

Lucie Mullen took her painting down from what was becoming a progressively barren wall. Her portrait was like that of a stained glass Madonna, but instead, her face was modeled for another member of her close-knit community, a photo-artist named Johnny “Mike” Hollingworth. The bare walls were just the first part of the routine for the members of the Patchogue Artspace community. Just a day after the end of their Faces of Artspace exhibit, they had already returned their pieces to their apartments and were already planning for the next exhibition. They all live at Artspace, a community of affordable apartments designed to accommodate artists. At the Patchogue Artspace, most of the artists know each other, and the influence flows back and forth. Rich Belsky, who’s dressed in a newspaper boy cap and rolled up sleeves, works in glass. Sonia Vera-Leon and Lisa Destefano didn’t wear shoes for the trip…

Neil Simon, Neil Simon, Neil Simon… no matter how many times I hear that name all I seem to get is “Paul Simon.” It’s like hearing folks talk about Brian Williams and realizing you’re wondering “what the Beach Boys guy could’ve possibly done from beyond the grave that could tick off so many people.” Once you (and by “you” I mean “I”) eventually realize that the two aren’t the same and are actually very different people with very differing skill sets, you (again, “you” meaning “I”) can recognize the former Simon for what he is: an award-winning play and screenwriter. Simon has won Tonys, Pulitzers, Golden Globes—guys’ at least as famous as Machu Picchu (apparently). Rumors, written by Simon and put on by SBU’s Pocket Theatre, is a story based on lack of communication, and more specifically it’s the story of how a bunch of out-of-touch rich folk spend an…