By Najib Aminy The commercialization of hip-hop, its overabundance in mainstream airwaves and the overall declining quality in its music has led me to believe that hip hop is dead, or at least it should be. There is that broad yet very disappointing stereotype that hip-hop, rap and everything in between is a reflection of catchy rhythms and socially lyrical flaunting. Cars, hoes, sex, money and jewels—the lyrics are new but the topics are not. Whether it’s Lil B, the latest artist or Wiz Khalifa who as of recent sits near the top of the Billboard, hip-hop music has been saturated with what sells and what is catchy. That’s why it was so refreshing and entertaining to listen last Friday to underground hip-hop legend Immortal Technique and the acts that preceded his, including local Long Island performer Diabolic. Whereas artists like Khalifa, who in his single “Say Yeah” samples the…