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More than 160 people from the Stony Brook University community gathered inside the Student Activities Center on May 7 for a vigil to remember Nicholas Holt, 18, a freshman biology major who died on April 29. “Seeing him go so early in life was like a wake-up call,” Benjamin Hart, a close friend of Holt’s who helped organize the vigil, said. “Cherish people in your life because you never know when they will be gone.” The somber mood in the room changed when people remembered Holt, recalling stories that filled the room with laughter. Hart described an incident when Holt sent him a Snapchat of a peanut butter sandwich made with an entire jar of peanut butter and a large protein shake. Holt titled the Snapchat “#bulkingseason.” When Hart got back to the room, the barely eaten sandwich was in the trash and the protein shake was stashed in the…

Brookfest is never not a mess. Information is often difficult to find, emails get lost in the Google digital labyrinth and the excitement over Future/Cash Cash disappears over the fury of a thousand Seawolves not getting their beloved floor tickets. Well, the Press decided to collate all the information, lost in the newsfeed, on the official Facebook event page for your reading pleasure. Why haven’t I gotten an email? The way Google handles emails prevents USG from sending out thousands of emails at a time. There’s a cooldown period between sending out large batches of emails to keep spambots out of your inboxes. So don’t worry, you’ll get an email sooner or later (no promises on whether you’ll get floor or stand tickets, or if you’ll even get in at all). Why didn’t I get a floor ticket? The early access form was sent out at 12:55 PM, and those who…

Tripling By: James Grottola, Michelle Karim & Samantha Mercado While it’s not exactly stuffing them in sardine cans, the effect is the same. Stony Brook University, has had the largest number of housing applicants.34,000 this fall, according to President Stanley at his State of the University address. And as a result, almost 700 Stony Brook University students have been placed in overcrowded dorms. With a housing shortage reaching maximum levels, 85 percent all of Stony Brook’s incoming freshmen are nearly guaranteed to have three people living in designated double rooms, according to Kathryn Osenni, an office assistant at the Campus Residences office. The standard accommodation offered by the school is two people per room. These changes have taken place, sometimes, without the resident’s knowledge. “I signed up for a double room but with an unofficial understanding that I would be tripled,” first semester freshman Hayley Rein said. Rein is currently living…

Greetings fellow drug enthusiasts. While you might have been hoping for a topic this month that was unfamiliar, or at least peaked your curiosity, in light of recent events throughout our campus, it’s a good time to discuss our need for booze. Alcohol has always been, and as far as I can tell will always be, the choice drug for the majority of students. Some use it to unwind after a long week of grueling work, surrounded in an otherwise immobile room of frat brothers and random strangers, while others choose to enjoy a simpler night with a handle, a few friends and Cards Against Humanity. Being heavily consumed, however, alcohol has the opportunity to cause trouble, more so than other drugs, whether that means a night of regrets, or in most cases, your head stuck in a semi-clean stall for an hour or two. At it’s worst, alcohol can…

A patch of grass was spotted on campus outside the Psychology A building yesterday. The grass was described as “muddy, disgusting and covered with geese shit,” by a student running late to their Slush Puddles 280 course. Unfortunately, we could not further investigate these claims as the ground has since been covered by snow once again. “There is no grass. There never was any grass,” University Officials state.

Despite the majority of Republican corporate spokespersons that have taken control of the senate following the midterm elections, liberal movements such as the push for drug reform were undoubtedly successful this past election. With laws being passed in Alaska, Oregon and Washington D.C and narrowly missed reforms such as those in Florida, drug reform may finally be gaining the surge it needs in the US. What does this mean for U.S. citizens, you may wonder? A lot more than just being able to possess pot. For obvious reasons, you may soon have another reason to catch up on your American History when you visit the land of the federal government. On November 4th in D.C., residents helped pass Initiative 71 allowing individuals to legally possess up to two ounces of Marijuana and three mature cannabis plants, to transfer one ounce of marijuana to another individual, and to buy and sell…

Hallucinogens are by far the most misunderstood drugs on campus. Ranging from unusual, mildly dangerous, and risky deliriants such as datura; to the ever elusive, powerful, and desired psychedelic, DMT; the legal almost-everywhere breakthrough disassociative, salvia; and the more common classical psychedelics of LSD and magic mushrooms; hallucinogens come in several varieties with unique effects. Since, however, it would be truly unlikely to encounter any form of deliriant use, or minimal use of disassociative use on campus, let’s stick with the safe use of classical psychedelics and the wonder psychedelic, Ibogaine.