Author

Michelle Toussaint

Browsing

For over two years, hip-hop fans have anticipated the release of Aubrey Drizzy Drake’s fourth studio album, which was first announced at Hot97’s Summer Jam in 2014. Drake said he hadn’t yet started on the album but he already had a name: Views From the 6.   To hold fans over, Drake dropped the surprise mixtape If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late that was filled with so many bangerz, some marveled at the greatness that could be Views. Factor in the savage lyrical obliteration of Meek Mill with “Back to Back,” when Drake said “I took a break from Views, now it’s back to that,” anticipation for the heat that could possibly drop intensified. A joint mixtape with Mr. “I’m Not Just A Local Pedestrian,” aka Future, had fans, like myself, asking one question: Where’s the album Drizzy? Earlier this year the date was announced: April 29th, and it’s…

On a Saturday morning in Brooklyn, 11 teenage boys sit around in a circle harmonizing sounds. They use  their mouths, hands, pencils and even a piece of hard Starburst candy against classroom desks. “Now that was better than last time,” Program Instructor Samuel Lee, says. This isn’t a traditional Saturday school session. The students aren’t sitting in neatly aligned rows or studying for the SAT. Instead, the teacher gives each student an hour to make a minute-long instrumental for a TV show of his or her choice, using only AudioTool, an online studio program. They’re enrolled in a non-profit organization called Building Beats. Building Beats is a program that teaches life and entrepreneurial skills to underserved youth through the art of DJing and digital music production. Every Saturday, the nonprofit organization Building Beats holds a workshop in collaboration with the homeless youth outreach program Safe In My Brothers Arms (S.I.M.B.A).…

A simple glance at Michaela Young displays a lot of her personality. From her slightly cropped hair to her crossfit trainers, she personifies athleticism. As a part-time student at Stony Brook University, Young drives over an hour from Manhasset twice a week. Outside of being a student, the 22-year-old Business major is also a partner at Manhasset Fitness Center, in Nassau County. The gym has been featured on the “Business Buzz,” a television program promoting local businesses and their communities by the North Hempstead Business & Tourism Development Corporation. Young became a partner at the Nassau county gym when she was just 19. While in high school, Young attended another gym that she felt didn’t offer a quality experience. Though the gym’s trainers were highly skilled and educated, they weren’t being given the opportunity to truly showcase their talent. Young, along with other customers, felt she was missing out on…

Stony Brook University’s Psychiatric Epidemiology Division of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science received two grants from NASA seeking to investigate “asynchronous communication methods for developing behavioral health treatment during long duration space missions,” meaning that they’re trying to find different modes of communication that will be most effective for astronauts’ behavioral health. The grants for the three-year research project totals over $750,000. In early September of this year, NASA launched the Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences 2015 program, calling for new proposals for its space program. With the recent discovery of flowing water on Mars, NASA is planning missions to Mars that will require astronauts to spend longer durations in space. During this time, astronauts will experience a forty-minute delay in real time communication. Without ample forms of communication with mental health professionals on Earth, astronauts’ behavioral health may be at risk. “Projective health risks include…

In a unanimous decision, Stony Brook’s Undergraduate Student Government approved funding for Active Minds, a nonprofit mental health advocacy organization, for the spring 2016 semester. Active Minds was established in 2003 as “the voice of young adult mental health advocacy nationwide.” Alison Malmon, then a junior at the University of Pennsylvania, created the program in 2000 after experiencing a life-altering tragedy. In a CBS Cares campaign, which is a public service announcement dedicated to addressing a range of health issues, Malmon speaks of her brother Brian, whom she described as her best friend. “He went to college and struggled with depression. He felt alone,” Malmon said. She spoke about how her brother kept his emotions from everyone. He felt like everything he was going through was caused by his own actions and, because of this, no one would understand. After three years of experiencing this, Brian did finally share his…

More than 1,000 people gathered in Washington Square Park earlier today, for a vigil mourning the victims of Friday’s Paris attacks. Groups waved flags and sang La Marseillaise, the French national anthem as signs of solidarity. Mayor Bill de Blasioarrived  around 2 p.m., and spoke to the crowd. “New York City is proud to stand with France and share their clear message. These cruel attempts to intimidate and threaten the people of Paris will not succeed.” Some within the crowd silently wept, during the mayor’s speech. “When I heard what happened I immediately thought of my friends,” Lucie Maneval, a French national studying at New York University said.  “My heart hurts because I just keep thinking that I should be there. I should be in this moment with my people.” When asked about the world’s response to this tragedy, she replied, “It makes me feel good [seeing] how everyone is…

“I’m ‘bout to be professional. Homie I’m professional.” Name a rapper from an upper middle class Jewish family who calls himself “The greatest rapper alive.” If you guessed Lil Dicky, you’re correct! If not, be prepared to witness the next rap sensation aiming to introduce a new market to the world of hip-hop. With a self-described style of “funny-type rap,” Lil Dicky doesn’t display any of the qualities that make up the “typical” rapper. He’s lanky, slightly awkward, and always sporting a disheveled curly Afro. He kind of looks like an older, bearded Screech from Saved By The Bell (but that’s just me). Oh, and if you didn’t guess already, he’s white. Now, this isn’t unusual today with artists like Logic, Action Bronson and Mac Miller, to name a few, but unlike them Lil Dicky makes being a white guy a part of his brand. I mean, he even has…

Every once in a while comes a television series so refreshing that the cultural impact has the potential to transcend through decades. Recently, I’ve come to believe that series could be Sense8— now streaming on Netflix. Netflix has already established itself as a juggernaut when it comes to original content, with heavy hitters like House of Cards and Orange Is the New Black. Based on overwhelmingly positive audience feedback, Sense8 can now be included to its record of home runs. Though Netflix technically isn’t television, the series surpasses what Toby Miller, a social scientist, says television is supposed to do, which is (1) mirror reality (e.g. Seinfeld, 1994), or (2) create a televisual reality that appeals to a specific audience (e.g. Star Trek, 1966), as a form of entertainment. Sense8 does both. Sense8 is what I like to call “new generation TV,” or what Professor Jon Friedman, of the School…