Author

Gregory Palmer

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Michael Moore’s travels are now taking him to Italy, where he is comparing the European experience with the American one. The format repeats itself often, in one part of the movie Moore talks with two optimistic Italians about their working life. He asks them how many weeks of paid vacation they receive and they reply eight, which is nothing all that unusual to them. Moore, on the other hand, is pretty shocked—reflecting, perchance, the shared American perspective of the audience? The Italian couple then asks how many weeks of paid vacation Americans have, and he states, by law, none. This is a typical sort of moment that plays itself here, and repeats itself throughout the film: foreigners reacting to with disbelief to something most Americans consider normal. At first the Italians are so surprised that they assume it’s some sort of joke. So they ask him again if that is…

The Coen Brothers are no strangers to melding the conventional genres of filmmaking, so much so that the final product can’t even be labeled with a genre: they’re each one of a kind and just a grand experience of a movie. Hail Caesar! is another one of those kind of experiences where you just sit back and absorb the events around you and be amazed, even if it’s weird. Oh, and that’s the main movie I’m talking about, not the film within the film—that one is just hokey. Hail Caesar! is a story of many things, but the main story is focused on Eddie Mannix (Josh Brolin), a film producer and famous “fixer” who prevents many events in Hollywood from ever being scandalized. The real life Mannix was famously embroiled in a scandal himself with the death of actor George Reeves—who played Superman in the old Adventures of Superman series—as…

It does tend to put in people in a deep thought when they consider Steve Jobs’ entire career. People have what they have today because of the inventions he created. Starting from the simple computers of the 1980’s towards the iPad in the new millennium, all those small innovations have created a cult of obligation to Jobs, and it’s quite apparent that he was aware of that. I do, however, thank the invention before the man, and that’s the impression I assumed after watching the film Steve Jobs—but we’ll get to that later. First off, didn’t a movie like this come out not too long ago? Just two years, in fact? Yes, for those who might recall, the film Jobs (2013) was also a biopic on the man of the same name, which starred Ashton Kutcher. To say little of that film, it gained notoriety for being the TV movie…

It’s impossible to throw oneself back to the time when the fear of nuclear weapons was at its height in the minds of the masses, especially those who lived in Japan. It’s surprising to know there were those who felt safe in the presumed knowledge that it may never happen again. Still many lived in a dark time when they had no idea what nuclear war would bring next. I Live In Fear (sometimes referred to as Record of a Living Being or What the Birds Knew) observes an individual of that time, whom is both fearing and in hope but is at the center confused. Set a mere ten years after Nagasaki and Hiroshima were paved away by the atomic bombs, the film focuses on—through the observations of Dr. Harada (Takashi Shimura)—an old man in a foundry family, Kiichi Nakajima (Toshiro Mifune). We see early on that Nakajima is…