Author

Demi Guo

Browsing

Evan Jackson Leong, 37, has been working on Snakehead, a film about the New York Chinatown underworld, for nearly 10 years. He is best known for directing the 2013 Sundance selection film, Linsanity. D: What jump-started the idea for Snakehead? E: I was inspired by the story of Sister Ping in New York Chinatown. The story of what she represents in the community, but also what she did and the way it all happened, was all very intriguing to me. I realized that’s a story that I’ve never seen on film or in movies, and I know a lot of strong Asian women in my life that aren’t necessarily dragon ladies and aren’t necessarily submissive, they’re three-dimensional. But there’s a lot of powerful and strong woman leaders in the community and I can relate to that. So I know what she is, I know what kind of Chinese woman she…

A Stony Brook University graduate student was released earlier today after being detained at John F. Kennedy International Airport for over 24 hours because of President Donald Trump’s latest executive order. Vahideh Rasekhi, who was coming back to the United States after visiting family and friends in her native Iran, was one of many of travelers detained upon landing due to an executive order signed by President Trump last Friday. The ban prevents citizens of Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Somalia, Syria, Libya and Yemen from coming into the US regardless of their valid visas or green cards. “I was scared,” Rasekhi said. “I was super scared that I was gonna go back, that I was going to be deported.” Rasekhi, the president of Stony Brook’s Graduate Student Organization (GSO), is studying for her Ph.D. in Linguistics at the University, and news of her detainment spread quickly within the…

Once the grounds of a Chinese-Italian gang affair, the storefronts and doors of Bowery are crammed together in a wall of reds and greens. Jerry Wong first turns toward a storefront. He buys grapes, greets the grocer as he weighs them and makes a turn into a sliver of the wall that only the trained eye can see. This next turn is through a door. Then it’s up the sunken stairs to the third floor where the grandmaster is waiting. He passes the bag to the grandmaster, Eng Tak Wah, one of the last inheritors of Lower East Side history. There are some things that will never be seen in gluten-free New York again, or at least seen running open in the streets: death contracts between martial artists trying to open their schools, Little Italy’s men calling “Hey buddy!” from their perches by Columbus Park, the meager women distributing their…

He has jutting cheekbones and wary eyes. The world goes quiet for a moment, the sounds of a kitchen muted and comfortable against the layered still of roasted ducks in a window. The camera closes as he uncomfortably descends the tight walls of the restaurant. Jake Choi has every look of a man who has been running until he realized that the thing he was fleeing had hunted him down. In the world’s aquarium, there is something profound in finding the concave of your fishbowl among the gallon tanks. What director Ray Yeung worked five years to complete in “Front Cover” is a universal narrative recalled by his school days in London and rewritten into New York—the story of a “minority in a minority.” We are here for the characters, who are gay and Asian and a million miles from mainstream. Ryan Fu, a gay fashion stylist, must work with…

A tenth grade student from Nassau County became one of 41 finalists in the international Conrad Spirit of Innovation Challenge on Feb. 18. Scott Soifer, 15, of North Shore Hebrew Academy High School, placed in the Health and Nutrition category for his invention, the Vehicular Heatstroke Prevention System. Designed to combat heatstroke deaths in cars, the VHPS detects life using a nondispersive infrared sensor for carbon dioxide and a micro-electro-mechanical system thermal sensor for temperature, Soifer said. When the device senses high cabin temperatures, through carbon dioxide from human respiration and changes in body temperature, it alerts caregivers and emergency personnel. Most importantly, it does something similar inventions were never designed to do: activate the vehicle’s air conditioner. Nancy Conrad, the founder of the competition, said the panel looks for submissions that use existing technology as a blueprint and “this is exactly what Soifer’s invention does.” After all, Soifer isn’t…

Before you read this, I need you to go on YouTube. Search for “akatsuki shikata akiko.” It is the second ending theme for the anime adaptation of this manga. Continue. Magical girl twirling. The friendzone. The princess and her harem of male bodyguards. The princess blubbering and crying. The princess shooting 200 arrows a night to protect her childhood friend. The princess being protected by her loved ones. Body horror on the battlefield. This is a shōjo manga by Kusanagi Mizuho. In a tri-colored world as exemplary of good East Asian fusion as Avatar: The Last Airbender, the eponymous Princess Yona sets off with four legendary dragons in an anime sent off by a multi-voiced singer who can record up to 200 vocal tracks in a single song. After discovering her childhood friend and crush, Su-won, killing her father, and barely fleeing Hiryuu Castle, the stronghold of the fictional Kingdom…

Downtown Flushing, Queens. The doctor’s assistant talked as he worked. He had heard of Stony Brook University, he told us in an accent like our own, but he had attended another American medical school. “Are you a royal prince?” my mother inquired further, her Beijing accent subdued. “Yes,” said the assistant, not offended. “Where are you from?” He replied, unsurprisingly, “Qingdao.” Of course. Why else would he speak Mandarin in an accent that, quite frankly, held as much retroflex as our own? His city has, for the past century, been the hub of activity in Shandong province; a neighbor of Beijing. Like all northerners, their people punctuate their sentences with rolling Rs, unabashedly slurring their words together in an accent so guttural it would make a German blush. — There is no doubt that children are precious in every culture, least of all in Chinese culture. The one-child policy has,…

It was on a train between Wuhan and Xi’an that I did the most illegal thing in my life. I criticized the government. Jing–a regular student at Zhongnan University of Economics and Law–had spoken about the argument over Weibo, China’s online news blog, about whether or not to give independence to Tibet and Xinjiang and their ethnic minorities. But it was while our classmates—Stony Brook students like me—slept in their overnight train bunks that she and I sat down to talk about the divide between China and the United States. She was a polite, soft-spoken girl studying French to become an international businesswoman. I had thought French was a useless language until I met fellow foreign students from Africa and France in our dormitories—which is rich coming from me, a German minor. “How do Americans portray China?” she asked me. Outside, the Chinese countryside, in all its familiar unkempt greenness,…

The non-indictment of a policeman who fatally shot 12-year-old Tamir Rice sprung the BlackLivesMatter movement anew in Washington Square Park tonight. As marchers from NYCRISEUP4TAMIR braved the sleet down Broadway protesting police brutality and systematic racism, the movement’s supporters agreed that the string of injustice since the Mike Brown case has hit a new low. “It is not okay,” Jawanza James Williams, an organizer for the youth activist group, Vocal New York, said. “To not even consider the fact that the state-sanctioned murder of a child, of twelve year old Tamir Rice in Cleveland, Ohio, is not racial. Because had that child been a white child, I guarantee you that at least three seconds would’ve been given to ‘put your weapon down,’ or ‘stand still’ or ‘freeze.’” The shooting had taken less than three seconds. “Even if the gun wasn’t real,” said Benjamin, a government worker who would not give…