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Andrea Keckley

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Getting through college is never easy. But as Emily Heyward knows, living with an invisible disability can make it even harder. Heyward spent two years at Spelman College before having a mental breakdown. She spent about a month in a psychiatric facility battling severe depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. In 2015, she transferred to Stony Brook University, where her grades dropped to a near failing point. It was then that she was diagnosed with dyslexia and attention deficit disorder. Despite these obstacles, Heyward earned her Bachelor of Science in Technological Systems Management this past May. Now she is working towards her master’s degree and plans to go for her Ph.D. But making it through college with psychiatric and learning disabilities isn’t easy. Stony Brook University’s Disability Support Services (DSS) worked with Heyward to determine what accommodations she should be able to request. For her, some of those include deadline…

Students concerned about health risks of drinking coffee can now consume it through IV drip instead. STONY BROOK, NY – It’s a well known fact that drinking coffee has its dangers, which is why many Stony Brook University students are now opting to inject it directly into their veins. The trend comes as part of the school’s initiative to use its status as a leading health sciences school to advocate healthier living. “These caffeinated beverages are highly marketable and seen everywhere in the media,” says second year clinical lab sciences major Jacqueline Clark. “We think it’s irresponsible to promote such unhealthy habits, so we’re taking it upon ourselves to promote a better way to get these chemicals into our bloodstreams.” Students who have adopted this new technique have reported overwhelmingly positive results. “My resting pulse rate beats as quick as a heart attack, but at least I’m never dehydrated,” said…

As colleges shift their priority towards the STEM field, the potential effects of curtailing the liberal arts have come into question. In recent years, many collegiate liberal arts programs have found themselves struggling to maintain a prominent role in higher education. State legislators have offered funding bonuses for high demand degrees that reflect work most needed in a given state. In turn, incentive to promote the humanities has declined. This has been seen at Stony Brook University, which chose to cut several humanities programs within the College of Arts and Sciences to address its budget deficit. And while research by the U.S. Department of Education has found that STEM degrees yield higher salaries on average than their counterparts, many educators are left to ponder the consequences of sending college graduates into the workforce without a solid foundation in the liberal arts. Bente Videbaek is a Stony Brook University Professor who…